How Technology Patents Benefit Innovation And Humanity

At least in the smart phone world, patents are what drive innovation, according to many experts. This is because new devices are being released on a regular basis where there’s intense competition and in such a fast-paced environment, companies want to protect their devices by ensuring they’re patented, which makes sense.

But others say the system is broken, mainly due to patents being issued to non-specific and non-original inventions, which may be the reason for so many lawsuits circulating around technology today. And the public has now caught on to the patent wars going on with smartphones, thanks to the highly-recognizable company names which recently begun lawsuits against those they accuse of using their technology.

Changes in the Patent Office

Apparently, many changes are taking place inside the patent office these days, as well as in the Federal Court of Appeals. Some examples include the release and usage of tools that will both greatly reduce costs and allow both the public and the patent office to create patents which are clear in their direction and help both parties to more easily move through the dispute process.

But in addition to the above, evidence is showing that patents are assisting those living in impoverished communities around the world. Although these communities are not thinking about when the next model of the most popular smart phone will be released, there other patented technology that is helping them improve both their standard of living and their income.

Saving Lives with Modern Tech

Among the many benefits of patented technology to poor countries is the fact that patents can offer security where life-saving assistance is needed. Think medical technology involving vaccines and devices for the purification of water. In the biotechnical arena, food can be provided at low cost due to the creation of international manufacturing and distribution networks.

Simply thinking about all of the devices which improve our safety can reveal literally hundreds of products, each of which at some point in its development obtained a patent so that the product’s original idea would stay intact.

Keeping Scientists at Home

Patents also help to keep scientists, researchers and other professionals in their home countries. Or at least, they would if those in developing countries would work to reconstruct their patent systems. Doing this would allow foreign inventors stronger patent protection while increasing economic growth in the tech sector of the country itself.

A country with good technology growth is also one where quality of life has improved. And a higher quality of life will be more likely to successfully tempt talented individuals to remain in their own country as opposed to traveling abroad for a career in the science or research fields.

Licensing and Its Impact

For those inventors not having the cash that a manufacturing plant for patented products requires, licensing a patent can ensure distribution. Any inventor can grant a license to anyone wishing to sell, import, sell, make or use their patented product. This allows the inventor to profit significantly, while using the money to further the research and development of future inventions.

Like systems which improve the quality of life for developing countries, licensing agreements can do the same, albeit in a different fashion. Licensing allows new employment to be created. This does result in the stimulation of the economy, although it will occur in the long term.

While there are still a number of challenges to the patent arena, and many wish there was an easier way to assist the world with its economic and health issues, it can’t be denied that patents have been responsible for a lot of positive change in the world already.

Featured images:
  • License: Royalty Free or iStock source: http://www.sxc.hu/photo/1185407

Guest author Jodi Grant writes on a variety of topics, particularly related to technology. She recommends www.high-speed-internet-service-providers.com as a resource for comparing options in broadband.