Creative Logo Designs for Inspiration

Certainly, there’s quite a bit of subjective opinion being expressed with regards to selecting a logo for your brand. Branding is more than designing a logo, but the logo is an essential branding element, so it must be evaluated with the same accuracy as the brand name itself. Don’t just rely on opinions: Someone does not like a certain color, another thinks the type is not distinctive enough, and you think the proportion is all wrong. Well, everybody has a right to their opinion, but for brand elements, professional criteria must reign. A much better way to evaluate and select a logo: That method is based on setting an objective, or objectives, for the logo before a designer even opens a job folder.

Those objectives must surely align with the branding strategy and the desired positioning efforts. Plus they must be communicated to the designer, along with any sacred cows which will save him or her time and frustration. It isn’t just alignment with strategies and objectives, though. The logo should be assigned a specific role in the mix of elements. For most logos, the role is to give the brand name a distinctive and appropriate image that may become a memory jogger. The perils of inexperience and mediocrity: There are 3rd-year design students who’ll design a great looking logo for a number of hundred dollars.

That’s fine till you start to use the logo. Then you find the problems because it won’t translate well. How does it look at the bottom of a one column help wanted ad in black only? How does it translate into a four-by-six sign? Or stand out in the company of another 12 logos sponsoring a charity event? Students and novice designers have a tendency to look at logos as if in a vacuum: pristine and not related to the real world of commerce. Run of the mill graphic designers is also notorious plagiarists. They would like to be hip and follow the most recent trends.

Beware: Logos designed in this way will soon look dated. A logo must have a timeless appeal. Sure, with time a logo might need to be dated must be updated, witness the progression of Betty Crocker and of the GE monogram. But those changes were made over decades, not years. Aesthetic and mechanical criteria: Apart from the obvious it should also reflect the brand professionally and be pleasing to the viewer in all of its venues and variations. Well, paraphrase a few of them and many other criteria for judging logo candidates. For this reason, you should always go to a professional logo designer for your needs and a top option in today’s market is Starlink.au.com, which has an excellent pedigree and portfolio that they will happily supply on request.

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